Legal Brief: The Companies (Accounting) Act

Legal Brief: The Companies (Accounting) Act

Legal Brief: The Companies (Accounting) Act

The Companies (Accounting) Act 2017 (the “2017 Act”) came into force on the 09 June 2017 and it substantially amends, updates and supplements the Companies Act 2014 (the “Companies Act”).

It should be noted that the majority of the provisions of the 2017 Act came into force on that date with the new accounting requirements applying in respect of financial years which commence on or after 1 January 2018.

Employers – What Constitutes Reasonable Accommodation?

Employers - What Constitutes Reasonable Accommodation?

Employers – What Constitutes Reasonable Accommodation?

Earlier this year the Workplace Relations Commission considered a case which looked at the extent of an employer’s obligation to make reasonable accommodation for an employee with a disability. The case is useful, in that it provides an indicator to employers of what is expected of them in order to deal with a situation where they are seeking to reasonably accommodate an employee.

Tax Brief: Stamp Duty

Noone Casey Tax News, Stamp Duty

Noone Casey Tax News, Stamp Duty

The rate of stamp duty on non-residential property was increased from 2% to 6% with effect from midnight on Budget Day. However transitional arrangements are in place whereby the 2% rate of stamp duty will apply to binding contracts entered into before 11 October 2017 provided the instrument for the transfer is executed before 1 January 2018.

Did You Know: Illegal Interview Questions

Noone Casey Business News, Illegal Interview Questions

Noone Casey Business News, Illegal Interview Questions

In light of the recent Workplace Relations Commissions ruling against Minister of State for Training and Skills John Halligan T.D. regarding illegal interview questions, it is important to consider the “do’s” and “don’ts” of job interviews.

Under the Employment Equality Acts 1998-2004, there are nine clear grounds of discrimination: age, disability, gender, sexual orientation, family status, marital status, race, religion and membership of the travelling community. A question posed by the interviewer that falls under any of the aforementioned grounds during a job interview is prohibited. Many companies, and evidently State Departments, have found this out the hard way.

All employers should be aware that questions referring to any of the nine grounds for discrimination need to be avoided during the application and interview stage. While such questioning may seem innocent in nature, beware they come with serious repercussions.

 

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